Fantasy objects – Plamo http://www.plamo.info/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 12:38:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.plamo.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-105x105.png Fantasy objects – Plamo http://www.plamo.info/ 32 32 Maybelline Great Lash Mascara 50th Anniversary https://www.plamo.info/maybelline-great-lash-mascara-50th-anniversary/ https://www.plamo.info/maybelline-great-lash-mascara-50th-anniversary/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 12:01:22 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/maybelline-great-lash-mascara-50th-anniversary/ The “romantic lie” is what French socialist René Girard calls the assumption that whatever we desire comes from the heart. It is the idea that desire is independent and is not influenced by the opinions of others. This is, of course, wrong. According to Girard, our desires are mimetic, that is, they are shaped and […]]]>

The “romantic lie” is what French socialist René Girard calls the assumption that whatever we desire comes from the heart. It is the idea that desire is independent and is not influenced by the opinions of others.

This is, of course, wrong. According to Girard, our desires are mimetic, that is, they are shaped and influenced by the choices of the people around us. Girard calls them models. According to Luke Burgis, the author of Wanting: the power of mimetic desire in everyday life, desire models are “people we turn to for information on what to want (usually without knowing it)”. And then there is the metaphysical desire, the desire of someone else’s desire. It has nothing to do with a specific object, like a car or a house, Burgis says. “It’s about being a certain way. It’s about identity.”

Glamor could be seen as a metaphysical desire. According to Virginia Postrel, author of The power of glamor, “Glamor is not something you own, but something you perceive.” It is someone else’s fantasy who wants you and it gives you the illusion of power.

When Maybelline Great Lash mascara Launched in 1971, all of these factors were in play. The mascara was an instant hit, says Jessica Feinstein, senior vice president of marketing at Maybelline New York. Fifty years later, it’s still one of their best-selling products. The beauty industry has exploded lately, and every two days it feels like three new brands appear. In such a saturated market, how has Maybelline’s Great Lash remained so culturally relevant?

Maybelline large lash mascara
Maybelline large lash mascara

Victorian-era artists painted their wives with ridiculously long eyelashes, and by the 20th century the idea of ​​using mascara to enhance her bangs was gaining popularity in the United States. As the story goes, in 1915 Thomas Lyle Williams, a Chicago entrepreneur, noticed his sister Mabel mixing petroleum jelly and charcoal dust to darken her eyelashes. Inspired by creating a product that would enhance eyelashes without the effort of DIY, Williams developed a cake mascara that consisted of two parts: a dose of mascara product and a small brush. He started sending orders and named his company Maybelline, after his sister (Mabel) and his must-have beauty product (Vaseline). Decades later, Great Lash was introduced. “It was the first automatic water-based mascara,” says Feinstein, “making it much easier to remove than other mascaras of the time, which were wax-based.”

Maybelline large lash mascara

The rise of Maybelline mascaras was set against a backdrop of rising media and Hollywood. In the 1940s, cinemas and celebrities were everywhere. “Movie theaters have reached almost every American city,” writes Geoffrey Jones in Imagined beauty, “spreading new lifestyles and creating a new celebrity culture around movie stars who have exerted a powerful influence on the way beauty, especially female beauty, has been defined.” Big screen actresses wore eye makeup for their roles, and women watching in their hometowns began to emulate the looks they saw on movie stars like Joan Crawford and Merle Oberon. The 1950s also saw the use of celebrity power and new forms of advertising to influence the desire for dark lashes. “The first makeup ads that people watched during their TV dinners were Maybelline ads,” says Feinstein.

Desire models transform the objects before our eyes. Burgis describes how it works, below:

Say you walk into a consignment store with a friend and see shelves full of hundreds of shirts. Nothing jumps out at you. But by the time your friend falls in love with a particular shirt, it doesn’t. is more of a shirt on a shelf. This is now the shirt your friend Molly has chosen – the Molly who, by the way, is a costume assistant on the sets of big movies. As soon as she starts watching a movie. shirt, she makes it out. It’s a different shirt than it was five seconds ago, before she started wanting it. “

It’s the same with mascara. The desire to look a certain way or use a certain product is never really ours; the influence of others whom we admire or respect plays an important role.

Maybelline large lash mascara

The economic conditions of 1971 certainly helped too. “Any society in which people no longer struggle with scarcity but in the face of abundance will experience an explosion of mimetic desire,” says Burgis. In the same year, the first Walt Disney theme park was launched, Starbucks opened its first store, and Nike’s signature swoosh was created. Think about these three brands: they each have a logo that’s probably imprinted in your memory. There are several factors that go into branding, but for Maybelline’s Great Lash, color psychology was key.

Complementary colors (opposing colors on the color wheel) turn ordinary objects into objects that grab your attention. Together, the two colors create a visual tension that catches the eye and attracts the viewer. The complementary color of pink is lime green.

Maybelline large lash mascara

The choice of color combination was also inspired by Lilly pulitzer, says Feinstein. Pulitzer herself was a model of desire and her brand was a status symbol it was something that money cannot buy, regardless of whether you can afford the clothes, or in this case, the mascara. He represented the illusion of glamor, a metaphysical desire that remains elusive. It is not something we want as much as the life it promises.

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Long eyelashes open the eyes, evoking both mystery and invitation. The doe-eye effect of the long flowing eyelashes is related to the “baby face”, which is related to “personality traits such as honesty, frankness, warmth, naivety and kindness.” Babyface enhances the appeal of qualities considered feminine, increasing the value of beauty and attracting the attention of men.

In The deception, the desire and the romance, Girard affirms that “to imitate the desire of his lover, it is to desire oneself, thanks to the desire of this lover. This particular form of double mediation is called “coquetry”. The coquette does not want to surrender to the desire she arouses, but if she did not provoke it, she would not feel so precious. “According to the thesis of Nancy Ann Rudd in Cosmetics, consumption and use in women, the glamorous ritual of buying mascara, applying it, and arousing desire in others and yourself has given women a way to “enhance their personal identity building” while giving them a sense of individuality. of “cultural power and social action in a postmodern world”.

Maybelline large lash mascara

Mimetic desire generates mimetic desire. An internal Maybelline study found that about 13% of social posts on Great Lash mentioned his iconic status. “Great Lash Mascara is one of those products that is passed down from generation to generation,” says Feinstein. “The iconic pink and green tube is a staple in your mom, grandmother and sister’s beauty bag, and sparks special stories about the ‘first’ product you bought and used.”

Iconic brands remain so because of their ability to build a link with culture. Even though Maybelline’s Great Lash mascara performs, that’s not what gives it that iconic value. It’s what the brand stands for that gets the job done. These abstract ideas are delivered to us in the form of a hot green and pink tube and they are reinforced by the ideology that surrounds it.

Rather than crumble due to changing cultural tides over the past 50 years, Great Lash has only grown stronger. Its myth is linked to family heritage, the importance of passing on an object through the generations and glamor. These are values ​​that are intimately linked to the brand and with each stroke, there is a trace of hope that we will be able to reincarnate them for ourselves.

Maybelline large lash mascara


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The exhilarating experimental film Microcassette is placed on top of a garbage pile on a fantasy island https://www.plamo.info/the-exhilarating-experimental-film-microcassette-is-placed-on-top-of-a-garbage-pile-on-a-fantasy-island/ https://www.plamo.info/the-exhilarating-experimental-film-microcassette-is-placed-on-top-of-a-garbage-pile-on-a-fantasy-island/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 14:14:42 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/the-exhilarating-experimental-film-microcassette-is-placed-on-top-of-a-garbage-pile-on-a-fantasy-island/ Among the rubbish heaps of a large landfill on an imaginary Croatian island, a middle-aged man named Zoki finds a microcassette. Inexplicably intrigued by his discovery, he decides to find out who may have made the recording and for what purpose, using the description of the microcassette label as the only clue. Directed and released […]]]>

Among the rubbish heaps of a large landfill on an imaginary Croatian island, a middle-aged man named Zoki finds a microcassette. Inexplicably intrigued by his discovery, he decides to find out who may have made the recording and for what purpose, using the description of the microcassette label as the only clue.

Directed and released by Croatian artists Igor Bezinović and Ivana Pipal in 2020, Microcassette is a tribute to chance and imagination. Against the backdrop of the beautiful Adriatic Sea, Zoki’s chance discovery – along with his inexplicable obsession with “the smallest tape he’s ever seen” – takes him on a quest to find its owner. Using objects and people who also seem to miraculously appear in the landfill, Zoki begins to piece together a cartoonish picture of the life and loves of this mysterious person. “Hello, I am looking for a person named Petra. In Washington. She is from Croatia. I know she doesn’t like squid and she doesn’t know who Leonard Cohen is, but whatever, ”he said in one scene, speaking from a phone booth. Yet the viewer is keenly aware that the story he is building probably never happened. Microcassette opens with the warning line: “Not all is true in this story.” Even the existence of the landfill in which the story takes place remains uncertain.

Half documentary, half stop motion, half animation and resolutely experimental, Microcassettes gender is difficult to pin down; it is perhaps best described as an exhilarating journey of the imagination, to the rousing music of a Balkan brass band. For viewers, it’s unclear what the movie is about – is it setting up a fantasy world, poking fun at viewers’ perceptions of reality, or hiding a deeper message? Ultimately, such questions no longer matter. The mastery of the film lies in the fact that it manages, in almost 20 minutes, to hook the audience on a mission where finding the owner of the microcassette is not as important as continuing to explore all the places where clues can potentially lead us.

Selected for Thessaloniki Film Festival, Sarajevo Film Festival, Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival, and others, Microcassette will now have its international premiere online at the Calvert Journal Film Festival on October 28-29. Discover the full program and get your tickets here.


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3 fascinating Seattle-based museums https://www.plamo.info/3-fascinating-seattle-based-museums/ https://www.plamo.info/3-fascinating-seattle-based-museums/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 21:11:15 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/3-fascinating-seattle-based-museums/ 1. Museum of popular culture Geek chic Seattle has a long history of innovating and walking to the beat of a different drummer. Nowhere illustrates this better to visitors than the Popular Culture Museum (MoPOP) at the Seattle Center, 1.5 miles northwest of downtown. Created by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, it celebrates iconic moments in […]]]>


1. Museum of popular culture

Geek chic Seattle has a long history of innovating and walking to the beat of a different drummer. Nowhere illustrates this better to visitors than the Popular Culture Museum (MoPOP) at the Seattle Center, 1.5 miles northwest of downtown. Created by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, it celebrates iconic moments in animation, games, music, sci-fi, television, and other genres often overlooked by canon. His mission ? To “make creative expression a life-changing force”.

California starch maker Frank O. Gehry decided to mix the energy of hot rods and rock ‘n’ roll here in his first Pacific Northwest design. The structure shines with 3,000 stainless steel panels and aluminum shingles in psychedelic hues. It contains as many structural elements as a 70-story skyscraper and required software invented to develop French fighter jets. The daring building caused New York Times’ critic Herbert Muschamp to grab his pearls, claiming that it “looks like something that crawled out of the sea, spilled over and died”.

“It’s a work of art in itself,” says Jacob McMurray, director of conservation, collections and exhibitions. “Some galleries do not have straight ceilings or walls. The experience of the building is kind of a fantastic journey.

No other piece of architecture in Seattle reaches this level of bizarre and unique. It looks like the perfect shell for what we do on the inside. Also, how cool is the [Seattle] the monorail crosses it? ”

The museum’s original history dates back to 1967, when the experience Jimi Hendrix and Seattle-born band frontman first captivated Allen. But the ambitious project didn’t get off the ground until 2000. True to the tech industry’s ethic of ‘get out early, get out often’, MoPOP has undergone five mind-boggling brand changes over time. evolution of its objective. Today he celebrates everything from tattoos to horror props, Minecraft, Nirvana, Pearl Jam and The Wizard of Oz, and incorporates lessons, recording booths and performance areas

“We’re not showing things that are hundreds of years old,” McMurray says. “We explore topics that are part of people’s personal stories. Our job is not to tell you what is important, but to reflect what is important.

Highlights you’ll want to see include the Church of Heaven, named after Hendrix’s vision of an open-air place where people of different beliefs, colors, and experiences could come together and commune together. MoPOP’s take includes lighting from a 33 ‘x 60’ high-definition LED display, supported by world-class lighting effects and acoustics. “It’s such a striking place,” McMurray says. “We organize concerts and fashion shows there. Events too, such as campsites. When David Bowie passed away, we showed Labyrinth. People brought their sleeping bags and we had drink specials.

”Nostalgia can lead visitors to big reactions, such as crying when they see the guitar that Hendrix played in Woodstock. Others are overwhelmed when they see their enthusiasms – like the Disney costumes – taken seriously. And sometimes guests send enraged emails because “Nirvana isn’t punk rock, it’s grunge” or “Star Trek is way better than Star Wars”.

McMurray smiles. ” I love that. What better space to be than having people who are passionate about your content, even if they are pissed off? The worst part would be if they were just like, ‘OK, man, whatever. “

Director’s advice: McMurray says don’t miss “If 6 Was 9”, a “crazy tornado-like” kinetic sculpture of 700 instruments, 40 of which combine into one playable instrument – essentially a Voltron guitar. “It is a major piece of contemporary American art,” he notes, from Seattle-based sculptor Trimpin.

Plan your trip

Site: 325 5th Avenue N, in the Queen Anne neighborhood; 206-770-2700; mopop.org

Getting There : Park across the street at the Seattle Center 5th Avenue N garage (516 Harrison St.). In addition, 18 bus lines serve Seattle Center, as does the monorail.

Visit: Thursday-Tuesday (closed Wednesday); 10 am-5pm (also closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, Christmas and another day in December for the museum’s annual benefit)

Admission: Buy tickets online in advance, from $ 25 to $ 30

Best time to visit: From the end of the morning to the middle of the afternoon on weekdays, avoiding the peaks of commuter traffic in the city center

Best season to visit: If you’re a little scared, aim for the third Friday of the month, when MoPOP hosts its horror movie series to watch, It’s Coming From Inside the House, from January through October. A late spring festival also presents science fiction and fantasy shorts every year.

Accessibility: Visitors with reduced mobility often use the covered drop-off area at the entrance to 5th Avenue N and Harrison Street. Wheelchairs are available free of charge (first come, first served). Accessible parking available at the Seattle Center garage.


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Is it okay to torment non-player characters in video games? https://www.plamo.info/is-it-okay-to-torment-non-player-characters-in-video-games/ https://www.plamo.info/is-it-okay-to-torment-non-player-characters-in-video-games/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/is-it-okay-to-torment-non-player-characters-in-video-games/ REQUEST FOR SUPPORT: I play a sim-style game, and the non-player characters you deploy have particular skills, weaknesses, likes, and dislikes. So I put them sometimes in situations that I know will make them uncomfortable, like sending a guy who is scared of space to mine an asteroid. The results can be hilarious. But I […]]]>

REQUEST FOR SUPPORT: I play a sim-style game, and the non-player characters you deploy have particular skills, weaknesses, likes, and dislikes. So I put them sometimes in situations that I know will make them uncomfortable, like sending a guy who is scared of space to mine an asteroid. The results can be hilarious. But I also feel a little uncomfortable not letting them live their best lives. Am I unethical?

Dungeon master


Dear dungeon master,

Games of this kind allow ordinary people to live the fantasy of playing God. You become the demiurge of your own digital cosmos, dictating the fates of characters whose lives, as it is, remain subject to your whims. Playing them tends to raise the kind of questions that have long been addressed by theological and tragic literature.

Ever since we humans began to write, it seems, we have suspected that we are pawns in the games of higher beings. In the Iliad, Hector, realizing that he is facing death, complains that men are toys of the gods, whose wills change from day to day. This is a conclusion echoed by Gloucester in King Lear, as he wanders the moor after being mercilessly blinded. “Like flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods.” / They kill us for their sport.

In the book of Job, Satan and God bet that Job, a very righteous man, will curse God if enough suffering and hardship befalls him. After obtaining God’s permission, Satan kills Job’s children, his servants, and his cattle, and boils his body apart. Job, who has no idea that his suffering is simply the subject of a gentleman’s bet, can only assume that his misfortunes are divine punishment. “My flesh is clothed in worms and clods of dust,” he cries. “My skin is broken and getting disgusting … My life is a blast.”

It is difficult to read such passages without sympathizing with the human victims. And I imagine the discomfort you feel when you provoke your characters means that you suspect that you also make them suffer for your own entertainment. Of course, non-player characters – NPCs – are just algorithms with no minds or feelings, so no ability to feel pain or discomfort. In any case, this is the consensus. But humans, as you probably know, have a bad history of underestimating the sensitivity of other creatures (Descartes believed that animals were just machines and couldn’t feel pain), so it’s worth taking a moment to really consider the possibility of algorithmic suffering.

Many NPCs rely on behavior tree algorithms that follow rote if-then rules or, in more advanced characters, machine learning models that develop their own adaptive methods. The ability to suffer is often linked to things like nociceptors, prostaglandins, and neural opioid receptors, so it would appear that video game characters lack the neurological material required for a pain response. Emotional distress (our ability to feel fear, anxiety, discomfort) is more complex, from a neurological point of view, although emotion in humans and other animals often relies to some extent on external stimuli processed by the five senses. Since these algorithms have no sensory access to the world – they cannot see, smell, or hear – they are unlikely to be able to sense negative emotions.

Yet when it comes to the ethics of suffering, neurology is not the only relevant consideration. Some moral philosophers have argued that the ability to have preferences – the ability to see the world in terms of positive and negative outcomes and to develop decision-making processes regarding those outcomes – is a definitive yardstick of actual suffering. One of the advantages of talking about preferences rather than pain is that while pain is entirely subjective, experienced only by the sufferer, preferences can be observed. We know cats have preferences because they recoil from the tub water and sometimes run away when approached by dogs. The fact that your NPCs have, as you put it, “particular skills, weaknesses, likes and dislikes” suggests that they actually have preferences, although this is also something you can test by simply observation. When you put them in unwanted situations, do they resist or struggle? Do they exhibit facial expressions or body movements that you associate with fear? You might object that such behavior is simply programmed by their designers, but animal preferences could also be seen as some kind of algorithm programmed by the history of evolution.


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“Titanium”, Review: The Body Horror of Family Life https://www.plamo.info/titanium-review-the-body-horror-of-family-life/ https://www.plamo.info/titanium-review-the-body-horror-of-family-life/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:47:34 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/titanium-review-the-body-horror-of-family-life/ The curse of the genre is that it encourages filmmakers to downplay causes in favor of effects. In the best genre films, the amount and potency of these effects serves as enough compensation for the thinned drama. Julia Ducournau’s new film “Titanium” is a genre film, a touch of horror with a family touch, like […]]]>

The curse of the genre is that it encourages filmmakers to downplay causes in favor of effects. In the best genre films, the amount and potency of these effects serves as enough compensation for the thinned drama. Julia Ducournau’s new film “Titanium” is a genre film, a touch of horror with a family touch, like Ducournau’s first feature film, “Raw”. But “Titanium” is much stronger, much wilder, much stranger. The radical fantasy of its premise – a woman gets permeated by a car – tears the ensuing family drama out of the realm of the ordinary and becomes a speculative fantasy and imaginative wonder that demands a suspension of disbelief – which becomes the subject of the film.

The film’s protagonist, Alexia (Agathe Rousselle), has an affinity for cars that equates to some sort of fate. As a child (played by Adèle Guigue), Alexia sits in the back seat of a car driven by her father (Bertrand Bonello, himself a notorious director), who broadcasts music on the radio. But Alexia growls instead at the sound of the engine. Moments later, she unbuckles her seat belt, distracting her father and causing him to lose control of the car. Alexia suffers from a serious head injury and has a titanium plate inserted into her skull. Coming out of the hospital, she lovingly strokes her parents’ car, especially the driver’s side window, an ingenious Freudian touch that will resonate powerfully throughout the drama.

Flash forward, and adult Alexia performs as an erotic dancer at auto shows. She saw dancing in a place similar to a shed where cars are fetish objects. (A woman lathered a car and rubs her breasts against a side window.) Men wander among the vehicles, taking selfies with the women. With her unabashed attraction to cars, Alexia is a star in the field, and, when she dances energetically and curvy on a classic Cadillac, Ducournau renders her in ecstatically soaring footage. But, when one of Alexia’s male fans follows her and forcibly kisses her, she kills him – gore, graphically – with a stick shaped like a knitting needle that holds her hair in place. Then, while spraying her brain with her body, she responds to a thud, metallic noise at the door. The vintage Cadillac she banged and crushed on her flashes her headlights, and she walks up to her, naked, then walks in for a sex scene, in her front seats. She and the car – displaying fun with its increasingly vehement movement and flashing lights – bounce up and down in rhythm until the climax of both.

It’s hard enough for Alexia to cope in a world that isn’t inclined to take her sexual preference seriously, let alone her reciprocity. (The mocking tone of some “Titanium” reviews confirms this.) She is testing herself in a lesbian affair but is no more satisfied with a human woman than with a human man. She discovers that the car has impregnated her; already a killer, she kills again (and again), runs away and – cutting her hair, and tying her breasts and her visibly pregnant belly – assumes the identity of a teenager named Adrien Legrand. He disappeared a decade earlier as a child, but his case is back in the news. Spotted at the airport by the police, Alexia, in the role of Adrien, is taken into custody and seen through a one-way mirror by Adrien’s father, Vincent (Vincent Lindon), who claims to recognize him and takes him to the fire station where Vincent is the captain.

Here, with astute art, Ducournau casually casts an extraordinary detail, to let viewers meditate and absorb its mystery. The police offer to do a DNA test to prove Adrien’s identity, but Vincent refuses, he would surely recognize his own son, he said. Some critics have complained that his upbeat self-confidence is implausible, a ridiculous convenience to push the plot forward. Yet the active and autonomous embrace of Vincent d’Adrien (now called Alexia in disguise) is not a simple story lever – it is a mark of what it means to be a father and have a child. Whether Adrien was Vincent’s biological son does not matter: Vincent had (along with Adrien’s mother, played by Myriem Akheddiou) raised their son until the age of seven, and no retrospective evidence nor no doubt about his biological paternity will have any effect on his sense of the paternal bond. (An alert viewer might even suspect that Vincent is refusing the test precisely because he might know what he will reveal.)

When Adrien and Vincent arrive at the fire station, the film changes gears and becomes a thriller. Adrien desperately tries to keep her identity a secret even as her relationship with Vincent inevitably escalates, the pregnancy countdown inexorably continues, and the police draw closer to the serial killer Alexia. More importantly, the film’s emotional and dramatic focus turns, definitely, to the intensity of Vincent’s willingness to connect with Adrien, and the pressure on Alexia to support the fiction for her own good.

These subtle psychological maneuvers unfold alongside the harsh physical realities upon which the whole story and its very concept of selfhood depend. “Titanium” is a body horror film that relentlessly shows the anatomical agonies endured by its characters. Alexia has a large scar above her right ear, due to her childhood accident and surgery, and other marks left by her self-bonding. Ducournau shows her having an abortion with the same hair needle she used as a murder weapon and later slashing the flesh of her belly to force her childbirth and baring not muscles but metal. . Elsewhere, she slams her nose with her fist and hits it on a metal sink to change her appearance. The film’s explanation of bodily fluids (including Alexia’s various dumps, which appear to be based not on water but on motor oil) and the fierce physics that is on-screen all long set the tone for the eventful intensity of the story. The commanding and combative Vincent, too, punishes himself in his quest for strength, submitting to nerve-racking injections into his bruised buttocks to overcome the ravages of age. (Lindon, both crumpled and buff, comes across as a non-ironic version of Bill Murray.) More than that, the details of extreme physicality turn out to be carrying elements in the drama, doing the job as dialogue and the backstory doesn’t.

The fire station is a greenhouse of male ties. The firefighters, all men, work together, face death together and celebrate together in frenzied scenes of improvised dance evenings that exude a furiously submerged eroticism. Vincent’s quasi-paternal role vis-à-vis the young men under his command is also ambiguous – one of them, behind his back, suggests that Vincent is homosexual – and Adrien’s arrival disrupts and reorients the entourage. One of the young firefighters, Rayane (Laïs Salameh), considers Vincent a mentor, and becomes jealous when Vincent displays his attachment to Adrien through a particular kind of nepotism – training Adrien in firefighting and allowing him to join a very small team of first responders. In the extreme idiosyncrasy of this scene – played with a seriousness that stifles all humor – Adrien must resuscitate a person who does not breathe, and Vincent sings “Macarena” to keep the rhythm. (French liability law must be very lenient.)

Ducournau boldly goes beyond the absurdities of the story with an overheated style, filled with reverse dives that exalt the fury, daring and heroism of his characters, notably Vincent and Alexia. Their heroism is not primarily in fighting fires; it is in the force of their passion, the carefree intensity with which they follow the demands of their emotions and seek an ecstatic and white-hot redemption in their mutual bond. The relationship between them is highly gendered, and Alexia’s impersonation of Vincent’s son requires constant effort on many levels. To keep her secrets (and perhaps to hide her voice), she maintains a monastic silence. She is in tremendous pain as she continues to bind her body. Yet it turns out (carefully avoiding spoilers here) that, despite appearances, Vincent must also work mightily, at least emotionally, to overcome his judgment on appearances, which leads to another level of complicity and conflict. between them. Adrien ends up being unleashed in a scene, giving in to the desire for cars and expressing it in a dance of firefighters which at the same time delights, amazes and disconcerts the assembled company. In another, Vincent casually but cruelly submits to a self-mortification of vast symbolic significance.


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Fresno, Calif., Increase in violent crime reflects national trend https://www.plamo.info/fresno-calif-increase-in-violent-crime-reflects-national-trend/ https://www.plamo.info/fresno-calif-increase-in-violent-crime-reflects-national-trend/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/fresno-calif-increase-in-violent-crime-reflects-national-trend/ Fresno Police Chief Paco Balderrama at a September 3 press conference describing what was then the 52nd homicide of the year in the city, the shooting death of Michael Hartley in the 800 block of North Parkway Drive. JEAN WALKER Fresno Bee File Violence is increasing. Domestic terrorism is increasing, including threats against members of […]]]>

title=

Fresno Police Chief Paco Balderrama at a September 3 press conference describing what was then the 52nd homicide of the year in the city, the shooting death of Michael Hartley in the 800 block of North Parkway Drive.

Fresno Bee File

Violence is increasing. Domestic terrorism is increasing, including threats against members of Congress. The FBI has just published its Annual Report on crime. The bad news is that violent crime is on the rise.

So let’s think about the silence of violence. Violence produces bad results. It’s also silly in a metaphorical sense. Violence does not speak, it rumbles. Like a roaring lion, he does not argue. He only threatens and attacks.

Violence can be spectacular. It catches our attention. But violence does not really seek to persuade. Persuasion requires an argument. Acts of violence are not arguments. This is why violence neither creates nor converts.

The horrible truth about violence is well known. Gandhi explained it. Like Martin Luther King, Jr. Both advocated nonviolence as a higher path.

October 2 marks Gandhi’s birthday and is an International Day of Non-Violence. Gandhi said that even when the violence seems to be good, it is only temporary. Nonviolence creates lasting change because, as Gandhi explained, nonviolence is a “conversion process. “Instead of destroying those you hate, nonviolence builds bridges and finds common ground.

Gandhi demonstrated that organized non-violence can be a powerful force for change. Martin Luther King Jr. applied this method in the United States.

In his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize lecture, King Explain criticism of violence thus: “Despite temporary victories, violence never brings permanent peace. It doesn’t solve any social problem; it just creates new and more complicated ones. Violence is impractical because it is a downward spiral ending in destruction for all.

This truth is reaffirmed as we reflect on the consequences of the war on terrorism. After 20 years of war, one wonders if the war was worth it. The war in Afghanistan teaches us that violence is a brutal instrument to transform hearts and minds.

The “Costs of war” project at Brown University provides a recent summary. Adding up the deaths in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and elsewhere, they estimate that nearly 930,000 people have been killed in the war on terrorism. This includes more than 7,000 US military personnel. About 38 million people have been displaced as war refugees. The war is estimated to have cost $ 8 trillion.

We killed Osama bin Laden and other terrorist brains. But terrorists are still hiding in the shadows. And the Taliban quickly returned to power. The war has not solved the social, political and cultural problems that give rise to terrorism and oppressive regimes such as the Taliban.

War is a destructive force which breeds reactive antagonism. It does not educate, does not democratize, does not humanize. Political violence does not create just or lasting change. Rather, it destabilizes and provokes, causing polarization and pain.

This truth about war and violence is easily ignored. There is a primary need to use violence. We are animals after all. Like the lion, we roar. When pushed, we attack.

The moral traditions of the world teach us to subdue the inner lion. We’re not just animals, after all. We are human beings. We can learn to “turn the other cheek” and resist animal aggression. This is the message of Jesus and the Buddha, as well as Gandhi and the king.

Our own culture often ignores this message. We celebrate violence. Pop culture is full of gangsters and cops, super-spies and superheroes. Our culture encourages us to mistakenly believe that power does good and that ultimately the good are justified in using violence.

But we are not superheroes. We are fragile and imperfect beings. And unlike a James Bond fantasy, real lives are destroyed when we extricate the lion.

The good news is that we are intelligent beings. We can learn from our mistakes. Violence involves a kind of blissful self-confidence. He fails because he treats other human beings like animals and objects to be manipulated by physical force. But human beings are not convinced by violence. We are motivated by pride and love, reason and morality.

Non-violence is not always effective. But in the long run it is wiser to keep the lion in its cage. Nonviolence appeals to the best angels of our nature. He treats human beings with the care and respect we deserve.

Andrew Fiala is professor of philosophy and director of the Fresno State Center for Ethics. Contact him: fiala.andrew@gmail.com.


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10 most iconic Disney swords https://www.plamo.info/10-most-iconic-disney-swords/ https://www.plamo.info/10-most-iconic-disney-swords/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/10-most-iconic-disney-swords/ For an empire built on magic, dreams, princesses and all that is whimsical and colorful, Disney certainly has a long list of weapons and weapons purposefully designed to do damage. While the studio is no stranger to magic wands, staffs, and even blasters and rifles, the selection of bladed weapons here is more than worthy […]]]>

For an empire built on magic, dreams, princesses and all that is whimsical and colorful, Disney certainly has a long list of weapons and weapons purposefully designed to do damage. While the studio is no stranger to magic wands, staffs, and even blasters and rifles, the selection of bladed weapons here is more than worthy of recognition.

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From sabers and rapiers to long swords and sabers, many of Disney’s greatest heroes and villains have worn a variety of different blades. Whether it was custom work to suit the character, magical items, or symbols of status or power, many have felt the sting of these enchanting swords.


ten The magic sword (the black cauldron)

While its name doesn’t hint at much in terms of reputation, the sword found in the bowels of the Horned King’s castle in Disney’s dark and fantasy epic is easily a sword that many future warriors would love to own. Not only is it a gorgeous, powerful blade that can cut like a hot knife through butter, but it has a mind of its own.

The main purpose of a weapon is to repel attackers and protect whoever wields it, and it looks like this glowing sword took the directive to heart. Even someone as inexperienced and green as Taran the Wanderer can pick it up and wield it with the greatest of ease.

9 The Singing Sword (which framed Roger Rabbit)

Yes, that’s an honorable mention. Yes, it’s an old joke from the Tex Avery cartoon days. But thanks to this Sinatra-shaped sword, many viewers cannot hear the song “Witchcraft” without thinking about this song. Who wants the skin of Roger Rabbit.

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It earns the spot on the list simply because it’s one of the movie’s most unforgettable gags and visuals. Plus, Bob Hoskins’ reaction to the cartoon drawing of an animated weapon is certainly worthy of a laugh.

8 Triton Sword (Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides)

Every great pirate captain needs an equally infamous blade to back this claim. Of course, a pirate as infamous and deadly as the notorious one like this Pirates of the Caribbean the villain needs something a little more special to further sell his intimidating nature. Blackbeard has a reputation to uphold.

This enchanted broadsword and cutlass hybrid is not only a great blade capable of splitting a pirate in half, but can bring the dead back to life, wield lifeless objects, and more than just the blade of a single. buccaneer could never dream. An OP touch for something of this frame, but certainly one of the best guns in the studio.

7 The Vorpal Sword (Alice in Wonderland)

It may look like a standard fantasy sword, but this beautiful blade is more than just a piece of aesthetic weapon. Not only is it the only weapon effective against the Red Queen’s Jabberwocky, but it acts as a visual symbol of Alice accepting her identity.

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Similar to Alice having her own revelation about her identity, the completion of the vorpal armor mirrors the completion of Alice’s mental journey. While the movie is hit or miss at times, the imagery with the sword makes for great visual storytelling.

6 Raya’s Whip Sword (Raya and the Last Dragon)

It should come as no surprise that Raya and the last dragon draws a lot from Asian films, mythology and fiction. Understandably, any great warrior deserves a great bladed weapon to fight their way through any obstacles that stand in their way, and Raya’s whip sword goes one step further in terms of style and efficiency.

Raya is an absolute artist with this blade. Even blinded by her own rage, she is still able to wield her weapon with the ferocity and skill of Jet-Li in the heart of an epic combat streak. Someone needs to add Raya to the Soul Calibur series or the next Smash DLC.

5 The Dark Saber (Star Wars)

Although he may have been introduced to the fandom through the Clone wars series, it was The Mandalorian which gave life to the black saber. The image of Moff Gideon breaking away from the wreckage after Season 1’s epic battle with the infamous weapon is a moment in Star wars that few fans will ever forget.

RELATED: The 10 Most Controversial Disney Animated Movies, Ranked

Considering that the Jedi are often considered some of the greatest warriors in the galaxy, building a weapon capable of taking on their lightsabers is truly an achievement. As deadly as it is visually striking, the Dark Saber is as much a symbol of power as it is a brutal weapon. Truly one of the galaxy’s most sought-after treasures.

4 Fa Zhou’s sword (Mulan)

Mulan takes her father's armor and sword

Although the live action Mulan the remake gave him a beautiful blade, the original sword seen in Disney’s Mulan is one of the most recognizable character pieces. Few Disney Princesses can boast of having a weapon of choice, but Mulan’s blade has as much personality as it does.

You only have to look at the guard’s monstrous face to recognize it as Mulan’s. Not only does she use her sword to save the Huns, but she uses her highly reflective blade to devastate their numbers and save her own battalion. Like Mulan, the sword is more than it looks.

3 Kylo Ren’s Lightsaber (Star Wars)

Kylo Ren lights his lightsaber against Rey

Yet another character whose weapon reflects their aura, Kylo Ren’s crossed saber was an extremely impressive piece of Sith tech when the trailer for the force awakens first abandoned. He was as brutal and unstable as his user, and he remains a favorite even compared to alternative swords like Darth Maul’s staff.

RELATED: All 11 Disney Animated Movies Released After Luca

Everything about Kylo Ren’s aesthetic makes a statement, whether it’s for better or for worse. The flickering lightsaber is a symbol of power and rage, while its fractured Kyber crystal represents the shattered state of being of its wearer. All things are forcibly connected, including the details of the dark side.

2 The Keyblade (Kingdom Hearts)

Let Disney create one of the most iconic video game weapons of recent years. The fate of hearts of various worlds lies in Kingdom Hearts Keyblade. Owned by users like Sora, Riku, and King Mickey, the weapon has the ability to turn the tide of the battle between light and dark.

Not only is it effective against Nobodies and Heartless, but it functions as a universal key, a sturdy blade, and a symbol of multiversal magic. In the wrong hands, it could mean the death of all existence. That’s awesome firepower coming from Mickey Mouse.

1 The sword in the stone (The sword in the stone)

Arthur pulling the sword out of the stone

Often regarded as one of the most famous fictional blades, King Arthur’s Excalibur has more than a solid reputation surrounding it. Seeing how Disney’s take on the legend is likely the first that many viewers are presented with, it seems entirely fitting that it takes the top spot.

Seeing the boy in his squire outfit resting his hand on the sword as a celestial light descends on him and a choir sings from above really cements Arthur’s status as king past and future. Like the enchanted rose, the castle clock striking midnight, or Snow White’s first kiss, this is one of the most familiar images in the fairy-tale fantasy genre.

NEXT: 10 Funniest Disney Movies, Ranked

Split image of Thor holding a fake Odin and in an elevator in Thor: Ragnarok


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Get in touch with ourselves | Lifestyles https://www.plamo.info/get-in-touch-with-ourselves-lifestyles/ https://www.plamo.info/get-in-touch-with-ourselves-lifestyles/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/get-in-touch-with-ourselves-lifestyles/ A writer friend of mine, Shawn Smucker, said recently at the start of one of his email newsletters: Stay out of range. But telling our stories allows us to better understand who we are. Smucker mostly writes fiction with a bit of whimsy, but has also written many books telling the true stories of others, […]]]>

A writer friend of mine, Shawn Smucker, said recently at the start of one of his email newsletters: Stay out of range. But telling our stories allows us to better understand who we are.

Smucker mostly writes fiction with a bit of whimsy, but has also written many books telling the true stories of others, helping them preserve their stories. I have read at least four of his books: “Light from Distant Stars”, “These Nameless Things”, “The Day the Angels Fell” and “Break Away Amish”, a true story he wrote with Johnny Mast.

But now I’m reflecting on Smucker’s idea that “telling our stories connects us with who we are.” Did you find that to be true? Or is it too frustrating to write?

I’m not a great conversationalist – sometimes it is difficult for me to verbally express my thoughts in words and sentences, especially if I speak on the fly. As I get older, the word I’m looking for so often hides in my brain. I’m on the introverted side too, and although in this column I often write rather personal stuff, it works for me because my brain has time to process and rewrite. With the help of my trusty computer, I edit and rewrite until I am successful. Or at least, fair enough.

Over the past few months, as my sisters and I have met some of the people who care for my mother in nursing, I have learned that I am not very good at verbally sharing what we have heard or talked with. someone else, like my husband.

Another example, if I go to the doctor and come home and try to tell my husband what the doctor said, it’s kind of blurry in my head – unless I’m taking notes. . I often take notes if I go with my husband to his doctor, and it helps both of us. But in general, he’s more of a conversationalist, not a writer or note-taker.

A few years ago, a sister of mine gave our mother a journal with writing instructions. Things like “what was your first job” or “how do you remember your grandfather” and the like. Mom wrote a lot there that I can’t wait to read, but she said she didn’t want us to read these things until she was gone. So we basically honored that, but with glimpses every now and then. I’m so glad my sister discovered this kind of mom diary.

For 34 years now, I have been writing a weekly column. It’s kind of a journal. Recently I was happy to go to my 50th class reunion, a year late (yes, do the math, you know how old I am). I was especially happy to hear from different classmates that they like to read my columns. In Indiana, it is published in their local newspaper, The Goshen News. A few decent people have said, “I don’t always read it,” but they pretend to like it when they do. (Thanks, Gene, Galen, Jane and Jane!)

But my point here is to encourage writing or telling our stories to a loved one (maybe a grandchild or the child of a friend who needs to write / practice English) . There are many journals to choose from. A writer friend, Trisha Faye, published one titled “My Family Heirloom Journal”. This particular journal helps you keep notes of things that have been in the family and passed on to other family members – a good way to organize all those pieces of paper that your mom, dad, or grandchildren – parents may have noted and placed in old teapots or teapots. cups. Even a gratitude journal will keep your thoughts and feelings in one place over the months and years.

I would like to know what that inspires you to do, or what you have done to keep family and personal memories.

Send your comments to anotherwaymedia@yahoo.com or Another Way Media, PO Box 363, Singers Glen, VA 22834.


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Wanna Be Ink Offers Creatively Designed Temporary Tattoos For Residents Of Los Angeles, California And Around The World https://www.plamo.info/wanna-be-ink-offers-creatively-designed-temporary-tattoos-for-residents-of-los-angeles-california-and-around-the-world/ https://www.plamo.info/wanna-be-ink-offers-creatively-designed-temporary-tattoos-for-residents-of-los-angeles-california-and-around-the-world/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 13:38:07 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/wanna-be-ink-offers-creatively-designed-temporary-tattoos-for-residents-of-los-angeles-california-and-around-the-world/ Los Angeles tattoo retailer Wanna Be Ink For centuries, body art has been used by people to convey messages to the next generation, beauty, ceremonial activities, pleasure, and expression. Body art has since evolved into tattoos, an art form that has been gaining popularity for decades now. With numerous advocacy campaigns, matches and demonstrations on […]]]>

Los Angeles tattoo retailer Wanna Be Ink

For centuries, body art has been used by people to convey messages to the next generation, beauty, ceremonial activities, pleasure, and expression. Body art has since evolved into tattoos, an art form that has been gaining popularity for decades now. With numerous advocacy campaigns, matches and demonstrations on self-expression and individual identity, tattoos have become the inescapable symbol of freedom, peace, love, knowledge, of faith, hope and humanity. While most tattoos are permanent, the need for temporary tattoos has also increased for people who need to try something new or who are considering getting a permanent tattoo.

Wanna Be Ink is one of the largest temporary tattoo retail stores offering a wide range of uniquely designed temporary tattoos ranging from simple geometric patterns to intricate artwork, convenient for customers. having different lifestyles. The company was founded to create a space for individuals to celebrate who they are and what they stand for without the pain or permanence of regular tattoos. Wanna Be Ink backs its products with an industry-leading 100% guarantee, ensuring that every customer feels toasty and warm while enjoying their temporary tattoos.

Wanna Be Ink is led by a team of highly skilled, talented and experienced professionals who design tattoos, produce them and ship them to their clients on time and on time. The team believe everyone has a God-given right to expression, and that’s why they are committed to creating a variety of temporary tattoos.

As a customer-centric retail business, Wanna Be Ink regularly stocks temporary tattoos while making sure they offer fast shipping. They pride themselves on sourcing and manufacturing certified, non-toxic products for the safety of their customers, providing realistic temporary tattoos, and encrypting customer data.

Tattoo products offered at Wanna Be Ink

As part of its mission to encourage uniqueness and individuality, Wanna Be Ink offers men, women and children a portfolio of temporary tattoo designs to choose from. They offer temporary tattoos on sleeves and half sleeve tattoos that can last up to 28 days, guaranteed to make an individual stand out. The designs are made in a way that intrigues and teases while showing vulnerability, ferocity, calm, chaos, love, or any other form of expression required by a client.

Knowing that a picture is worth a thousand words, Wanna Be Ink also offers arms, chest, eyes, ears, stomach, legs, back, thighs, face, fingers, feet, lips, throat, lower back and under the chest. temporary tattoos. They help clients improve their personalities, show the world their moods, outlook on life, beliefs and principles.

Customers who choose to shop on the Wanna Be Ink site can select designs from large collections of animals, birds, moths, bees, butterflies, colors, dragons, flowers, plants, fancy, languages, food, holidays, events, metallic, shapes, objects, skulls, religious symbols, space, writings and tribes. They can also choose according to their preferences; avant-garde, manly, feminine, colorful or innocent for those who shop for children.

Additionally, Wanna Be Ink offers temporary henna tattoos that are creatively designed to accommodate changes in hair color, clothing, and lifestyles. They come in the form of floral designs, patterns, feather palms, a wide variety of symbols, and animal inspiration.

Even though temporary tattoos are convenient, easy to use, and space-saving, most customers might not know how to use them. For this reason, Wanna Be Ink has a Frequently Asked Questions section that provides insight into tattoo safety and handling, durability, and care once a client has tattoos, tattoo removal. temporary contracts and the application process.

For the quality assurance and safety of their customers, Wanna Be Ink has a privacy policy, shipping policy, refund policy, terms of use and COVID-19 response. Customers who need to be notified of promotions, new products and sales have the option of subscribing to the Wanna Be Ink newsletter to stay informed.

Contact Wanna Be Ink

Wanna Be Ink accepts payments from well-known financial brands including PayPal, MasterCard, Visa Amex, Discover, Apple Pay, Google Pay, Amazon, Venmo, Elo, JCB, etc.

To learn more about Wanna Be Ink, call (209) 926-6223. For any inquiries about the temporary tattoo designs they offer or to purchase, visit their website for more information.

Media contact

Company Name
I want to be ink
Name of the contact
Paul González
Telephone
(209) 926-6223
City
Los Angeles
State
California
Country
United States
Website
http://wannabeink.com/


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Michael Wolff’s landslide is a compelling tale of the ‘last days’ of Donald Trump’s presidency https://www.plamo.info/michael-wolffs-landslide-is-a-compelling-tale-of-the-last-days-of-donald-trumps-presidency/ https://www.plamo.info/michael-wolffs-landslide-is-a-compelling-tale-of-the-last-days-of-donald-trumps-presidency/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 16:06:14 +0000 https://www.plamo.info/michael-wolffs-landslide-is-a-compelling-tale-of-the-last-days-of-donald-trumps-presidency/ Work of Alex Williamson “He’s not gone, has he?” asks Harry Potter, about The One-Not-To-Be-Named. “Call him Voldemort, Harry,” replies Dumbledore the wizard. “Always use the proper name of things. The fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself. The United States has had no problem naming Donald Trump for decades, citing […]]]>

“He’s not gone, has he?” asks Harry Potter, about The One-Not-To-Be-Named.

“Call him Voldemort, Harry,” replies Dumbledore the wizard. “Always use the proper name of things. The fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.

The United States has had no problem naming Donald Trump for decades, citing the agent of its own degradation. But since Joe Biden’s inauguration on January 20 of this year (or even January 8, when Twitter suspended its most notorious user), Liberals have been in Harry Potter’s predicament: knowing Trump can return, and fearing what will happen if he does.

Michael Wolff has been the Trump obsessive columnist ever since Fire and fury became the best-selling record of a presidency in 2018. Unlike the less flamboyant journalists of yesteryear, Wolff’s eventful style lives up to Trump’s carnival style. A wild card with instincts for melodrama and the most purple prose, Wolff has good sources in government and stories you couldn’t make up. Landslide, the follow-up of Fire and fury, is a compelling account of the “last days” of Trump’s presidency – at least those of his first term – and exposes the risk that American liberals get so lost in the subplot of Trump’s election that they won’t not prepare for what is to come.

Surprisingly, Trump continued to speak to Wolff even after the reporter could no longer claim to be the kind of courtier the president demanded of his circle. Wolff undoubtedly confirms that Trump attempted what Latin Americans call a “self-help” – a seemingly legal and indefinite extension of power by a sitting executive before his term in office – starting even before the election. November 2020. Trump launched in the hope that someone would save him from his impending defeat. The failure of the self-coup, which was to take place through processes such as questioning the legitimacy of the election and overturning the results by friendly judges and lawmakers, n left that the possibility of a real coup to save Trump.


[See also: Paula Hawkins’s very British murders]

Wolff adds that Trump’s continued descent into his signature weaknesses sparked the denouement. In this critical period, as the elections approached and the consequences unfolded, it was, he writes, a “one-on-one White House.” After banishing anyone willing to interrupt his fantasies, with underlings rushing in like servants of George III indulging in his quirks, the weak president became even less powerful than he always had been. All Trump had was his obscure connection to the core of followers he had built up through his anti-elitism, misogyny, and racism. Along with the performative antics, it allowed him to more completely convert American politics into entertainment.

The self-coup that Trump so desperately wanted never froze, according to Wolff’s account, into a definite plan. Instead, there was an anarchy of “independents” undertaking crackpot schemes that regularly fizzled out. Part of the irritation (or pleasure) of Landslide is the parade of non-entities Wolff leads through his tale, the story of a giant planet and almost infinite minor satellites whistling in its orbit.

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Wolff observes that the “stop the fly” rhetoric – denouncing the illegitimacy of the vote – itself arose out of a decision not to contest the election for political reasons. Trump, Wolff says, hoped the election was “not necessarily a winning or losing proposition” but “a roadblock or a technicality to be circumvented.” The United States is lucky Trump lost the election because he didn’t really try to win it. Fanatically devoted for months to the mystical idea that running in person is the only legitimate way to vote, Trump has probably dealt the biggest blow to his campaign.

After recounting the agonies endured by Trump’s staff members on election night, November 3, 2020, Wolff reveals that the plan to wrest victory from the last was as much chosen as it was suffered. From the start, Trump had opposed postal voting, although those votes may have helped him win the election. After losing, Trump nonetheless attempted to disparage the practice, hoping it might spark enough skepticism that the self-coup might work.

Three days after the election, Trump’s campaign manager and his own son-in-law Jared Kushner told him there wouldn’t be enough votes to “find” to alter the results in the states that mattered. Trump refused to give in. But the big national news networks, pushed to wait to announce the result, finally called the elections the next day. The loss was now irreparable.

Rudy Giuliani, the grizzled former mayor of New York – once popular for his charisma in the days after 9/11 (and known for his overzealous policing of African Americans) – has taken the lead as the public face of the Trump’s wacky “plot”. “Rudy is Rudy, and Donald is Donald,” commented Roger Ailes, no less, the sultry founder of Fox News, in 2016. “Together, it’s an equation that adds to a loss of contact with most other rational people, if not reality itself.

[See also: Labour after the flood]

The rest of “Trumpworld” hated Giuliani and struggled unsuccessfully to keep the two men from turning the fantasy into a madness for two. The involvement of the liberals and the media in the alternate reality the two built over the following month was necessary and understandable, as ultimate power was at stake. But it also gave their idiots more credibility. Despite this, Trump’s attorney general William Barr, who had tolerated the president’s idiosyncrasies in his quest to protect the executive branch of the leader’s office, “officially left Trump’s circle,” Wolff wrote, announcing on December 1 that ‘there was no electoral fraud.

There may never have been a real chance that Trump’s confused dreams of a coup would come true. An impartial review of the evidence shows that Trump hasn’t even come close – blocked mostly by his own factotums and Republican Party officials across the country, including the right-wing judges he has appointed.

The capture of the Capitol on January 6 was also not symbolic of some sort of victory for Trump. The crowd that entered the Capitol building was made up of “radically faithful”, a motley group of laughable and frightening people. Unlike the tens of thousands of people involved in the most famous Communist and Fascist coups of the past – the October Revolution of 1917 or the March on Rome five years later – Trump’s endgame was marred by military opposition to his plans, which were foiled by his powerful supporter. allies in the executive and the legislature; not only Barr, but also then Vice President Mike Pence and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

McConnell had timidly waited to interfere with Trump’s musings, which led to disaster planning for a scenario in which Congress – without any evidence – could act to invalidate the election when it met on the 6th. January to certify the results of the Electoral College. It wasn’t because he loved Trump. Wolff writes that “it was impossible to exaggerate the hatred” McConnell had for him – this tension being “a central, albeit unheard of, drama of the Trump years.” On December 15, McConnell congratulated Biden as the next president. The following month, he and Pence refused Trump’s flattery and ultimately certified Biden’s victory. McConnell emerges as the institutional winner of the presidency, fighting Trump’s attempt to change America’s military position by withdrawing his troops while securing both the tax cuts and reactionary justice that mattered most to the senator. , before helping to deliver the coup de grace to the coup d’etat. We now know that a Conservative agent devised a plan for Pence, in his role as Speaker of the Senate, to prevent the election from being certified. Pence chose not to, despite the award being the end of his political career.

[See also: Ludwig Wittgenstein: a mind on fire]

“Politics can’t be a whim or a joke, can it? Wolff wonders seriously, as if his own style of journalism hasn’t done much to draw attention to precisely these dimensions of Trump’s reign. Even so, Wolff is correct that Trump is not gone. He will run for president again, the myth of the “theft” having survived its easy eruption the first time around.

Yet since Biden took office, Democrats have mostly transcended any obsessive fascination with the scene Wolff summoned. In a divided country, Trump could come close enough in 2024 to the presidency – or win it. If so, the key is to take the sources of your appeal seriously. The question is whether the Democrats will go far enough, because their own coalition is not taking drastic steps to rethink the social contract. Removing Trump’s platform helped Democrats, but not so much that it gave them an unassailable electoral majority.

Generations of ill-conceived politics fueling civic divide, leading to endless war and inequality, are the Horcruxes – the magic items – that fuel and protect Trump. The imperative is to destroy them before it’s too late, and before Trump’s comeback ends in a very different way than Harry’s defeat of Voldemort.

Landslide: The Last Days of the Trump Presidency
Michel wolff
Small, Brown, 336pp, £ 20


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